Posts Tagged: Hoka One One

It’s difficult to practice something when you only do it maybe two times a season. Sure I run hundreds of training runs in a year, and thousands in my lifetime so far, but a 100 mile race is categorically different than even the longest training runs I do. Over the past handful of years I have nearly always run 100 mile races in foreign countries, with lots of pressure and time zones to cross getting there. Mostly I have not fared well. There are a lot of reasons for this which I won’t dive into fine detail here. This past weekend I decided to do something a little different, to try and work on things during a 100 mile race where I was more concerned with the process and less so with the outcome. I found the perfect opportunity at Scout Mountain Ultras, a race expertly put on by Luke Nelson and crew up in Pocatello Idaho. For those who are not aware, this is an amazing mountain 100 miler, covering huge climbs, technical trail (and a solid amount of snow in this edition). I was also warned to be on the lookout for moose at the mile 35 aid station (spoiler, I didn’t get so lucky to see any). If I were you I’d put Scout Mountain on your shortlist for 2020. Here is what I learned:

Always pound cold brew at mile 80

Failure is a funny term. It means different things to anyone that uses it. It has been sighted that I am someone who happily fails a lot, especially when it comes to attempting FKTs. I have set out on dozens of different attempts on trail and mountain records over the past 15 years, and I have succeeded no more and no less than four times. When people use the word failure to describe all but the four successful attempts well , I get why they use that word. But the reason I am able to come back again and again to the realm of the FKT is that I don’t see missed attempts as failures, for me they are just part of the deal. The main weapon in my athletic arsenal is my ability to shrug off the misses without losing my confidence that most anything is possible. After a failed attempt on the Wonderland in 2016 the trail had woven it’s way into my mind, this year I had to go back and try again.

For the past few years I’ve gravitated towards doing, and putting more emphasis on longer races, primarily 100 milers. I thought that 100s had to be my best event. I mean I am not a sub 2:20 marathoner! I can’t compete with all these fast guys in the “short” distance ultras. I’ve slugged it out with long trails, Euro 100 milers and for the most part I’ve lost the battles. I certainly don’t intend to lose the war, but I needed to start 2018 on a good note. I decided I’d race at Way Too Cool. I’d never run this event before. With it’s long history and runnable course I figured I’d at least be able to maximize my fitness level and really see where I was at.

Summers never seem to last long enough. Not that I dislike winter, on the contrary, I LOVE winter. If I were not a runner, I would be one of those skiers chasing storms from the Northern to Southern Hemisphere searching for powder and steep lines 12 months a year. When I say summer is never long enough I mean as a runner, all the coolest, raddest, most fun trails are high up in the mountains where snow can linger long into July and August. There is a short window of time to tackle what has become a fast growing list of MUST DO mountain running objectives. A person could have worse problems obviously.

The Reviewer:  My name is Brett Hornig and I have been running for 12 years.  As well as being a Trails and Tarmac coach, I work at Rogue Valley Runners in Ashland, Oregon.  Ever since I started running, I have always been fascinated with what makes shoes so vastly different, and have continuously been on the hunt for that perfect shoe.  I have been eagerly awaiting the release of the Hoka Clayton, because I had a hunch that it might have a few more uses than Hoka was leading us to believe.  I took this shoe to the trails to see if the Clayton could be a suitable Hoka Huaka replacement that myself as well as many road/trail runners miss since being discontinued (in the states at least).
One thing to keep in mind when reading this review, is that I am 5’8″, 130lb, and have a size US9 foot that is slightly on the narrow side (C width).  I am a neutral, midfoot striking runner, so some things I describe about this shoe may need to be tweaked slightly depending on who you are and how you run.
SonomaSchranz1

A little after a marathon into the Lake Sonoma 50 mile. Thanks Eric Schranz for the great photo!